16 Fractals for 4 Ensembles

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“Writing this work, I was inspired with a phenomena of how transitory and partial is our perception of the Universe. As human beings, we are settled in fixed time-frames and spaces, which influences the way we perceive the whole. Even though we look at the same Structure, the point of view always differs and creates a special, unique performances. These, shapes our personalities, which create unique stories of the living beings.The aim of this work is to imitate this phenomena. I’ve created a small universe consisting of one, infinite graphical structure in the shape of a fractal based on a previously established mathematical principle. The work can be started from any of these 16 elements and each of them creates a different narrative built from the same set of events. During one concert, only one Fractal is performed – this way, the audience is able to listen to only 1 of 16 existing versions of the work, only one of many unique stories possible to create within this small Universe.” – Adam Łukawski

 

“Making conscious choices by designing links within the theather of life – this is the function of art according to the young Polish composer Adam Łukawski, who studies with Richard Ayres and Willem Jeths at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Fractal no 7 is a part of a brand new sixteen-part cycle, in which the underlying form principle of mathematical fractals leads to an infinite spiral. The composer considers the shape of these pieces as the imitation of our universe, because the listener can only perceive a fragment of the whole structure. There are four groups on stage: a traditional wind quintet, a ‘glass’ quintet and another percussive ‘quintet’. Each group plays for itself and has little to no interaction with the other ensembles. The note material for all groups consists of sixteen elements that the composer returns according to self-imposed mathematical rules. Łukawski elaborates on the techniques of limited aleatoricism and coordination technique developed by the American composers John Cage and Christian Wolff and his compatriot Witold Lutosławski.” ~ Michel Khalifa

Full score

Fractal no 7:

Fractal no 13: